Tag Archives: vegan tips

Habitant Garden Style Vegetable Soup Review

In keeping with the cold-outside/winter is coming weather, I decided I’d go ahead and do a review of a classic cold weather food: soup!

If you saw my Surprising Vegan Soup collage, then you’ll hopefully have stocked up on some delicious soup to keep you going long after the holidays are over.

This is also going to be the last Product Review of 2018! (They will continue to go up on the 13th of every month)

Okay, without further ado, here’s the Habitant Garden Style Vegetable soup review.

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The first thing I want to address is how f*cking big of a can of soup this is. Seriously. They’re 796ml – that’s easily enough for two bowls of soup. (Maybe even three) Why does Habitant only make such giant cans of soup? They’re usually located on the bottom-er shelves in the soup aisle because they’re so friggin’ big. I don’t know why exactly they make cans of soup for giants, but I’m 100% here for it. I like that this can offers a lot of soup, especially because it’s pretty cheap. You get a lot of soup-per-dollar.

One thing I don’t like about this soup isn’t even related to taste – it’s that there’s no tab on the top to open it. Look, I understand that not every can needs a pull open tab, but (especially because the can is so big) having the tab on the top would make it much easier to open without taking the entire top off, so you can close the lid back down and save it for later, instead of having to pour it out into a container. It’s not that big of a deal – I remember back before those easy-open tabs weren’t even a thing – it’s just something to keep in mind.

In terms of cooking, it’s really easy. Just open, heat on a stove (or in the microwave if you do that sort of thing) and serve. Very simple process. Even people who can’t cook can do it. This also bodes well if you’re really sick and would like something easy and fast to make, so… two birds?

Now, for the actual taste, it’s… soup. If you read my Amy’s Alphabet soup review, you’ll know that I’m not really that big of a fan of soup – I don’t know what it is, I just prefer my meals to be solid.

I don’t hate soup, I just would rather eat say… a sandwich instead. Soup is weird though, you’ve gotta admit that. It’s closer to a beverage then a meal. They should start selling soups in juice containers. That would also make it easier to save some of them for later, so there you go. Take note Soup World.

I don’t want to knock this soup – especially because it’s one of the few that aren’t marketed as being vegan that we can eat – but there’s honestly not too much to it. It tastes exactly how you would expect it to: like vegetables in some broth. It’s not overly salty like I’ve had in some other soups, and it doesn’t taste too watery either. It’s well balanced in terms of it’s flavours, and it has little grains of I think rice (or really tiny pasta shapes) in it as well. That helps fill you up better then soups that don’t have pasta/rice in them, in my opinion.

Other then that, I don’t really have too much to say about this product. It has vegetables in it (so it’s good for you!), is very easy to make, and comes in one of the biggest cans of soup I’ve ever seen. It’s a triple threat!

All in all, I’d recommend you check out/try this product. It won’t exactly blow you away with how amazing it is, but it doesn’t suck. And, especially if you have a hard time finding specifically labelled vegan products where you are, this can I’ve seen pretty much in every store I’ve been in. So it should also be easy to find.


Need help finding more products to stock up with in the winter? Check out my Surviving Canadian Winters post.

Like the review? Check out more here!

Surprising Vegan Soup

Hey!

Sorry this post took so long, but I was having… technical difficulties waiting for companies to reply to e-mails. (If you follow me on Twitter, you know what I’m talking about)

Anyway, that’s also why I listed Amy’s Kitchen, because even though they’re marketed as being vegan (and are therefore not really ‘surprising’) I had to include them due to the lack of response from other companies about their products. I may or may not update this post with the new products once I hear back.


Winter is coming!

And what better way to prepare yourself for the upcoming -40 blizzard weather then with some pre-made soup?

Answer: There isn’t. Except for maybe also stocking up on some hot chocolate.

That’s why I’ve decided to make this Surprising Vegan Soup Collage, so that your shopping trips are that least bit less irritating. I know I don’t like coming in from outside, freezing cold, and then get sweaty standing in the aisles of stores because you’re reading ingredients on products.

Also, with the holidays coming up, you’ll want to save as much of your stomach room as possible for the festivities. These soups aren’t too filling, inexpensive and last a while on your shelf. (So you can have them stocked for that mid-January holiday burnout)

AterImber.com - The Veg Life - Vegan Tips - Surprising Vegan Soup - vegan, food, soup

From the top left-hand corner, the soups in this collage are:

  • Habitant Garden Style Vegetable
  • No Name Rich and Chunky Vegetable with Pasta
  • No Name Tomato
  • No Name Vegetable Broth
  • Lipton Cup-A-Soup Spring Vegetable
  • Presidents Choice Hearty Vegetable and Navy Bean
  • Amy’s Kitchen Light In Sodium Minestrone
  • Amy’s Kitchen Light In Sodium Lentil and Vegetable
  • Amy’s Kitchen Split Pea Soup
  • Amy’s Kitchen Fire Roasted Southwestern Vegetable
  • Amy’s Kitchen Chicken Noodle
  • Amy’s Kitchen Black Bean Vegetable
  • Amy’s Kitchen Minestrone
  • Amy’s Kitchen Vegetable Barley
  • Amy’s Kitchen Lentil Vegetable
  • Amy’s Kitchen Alphabet
  • Amy’s Light In Sodium Split Pea
  • Amy’s Light In Sodium Lentil Soup
  • Campbell’s Soup at Hand Garden Tomato
  • Mr. Noodles Mushroom
  • Mr. Noodles Vegetable
  • Knorr’s Vegetable Bouillon Cube
  • Compliments Vegetable Instant Noodles

**As always, these products being vegan is specific to Canada. Ingredients may differ from country to country.**

In my research, I also discovered that Campbell’s has a line of soups called Well Yes! (US only). The ones that are vegan from that list are:

  •  Campbell’s Well Yes! Harvest Carrot and Ginger Sipping
  • Campbell’s Well Yes! Lightly Salted Santa Fe Vegetable
  • Campbell’s Well Yes! Red Bean and Vegetable
  • Campbell’s Well Yes! Chickpea and Roasted Red Pepper
  • Campbell’s Well Yes! Italian Vegetables with Farro
  • Campbell’s Well Yes! Hearty Lentil with Vegetables

And there you have it! 23 soups you might not of known were vegan – completely by accident! You should be able to find these in any ‘regular’ grocery store. (I believe No Name might be a Canada-only brand)

Have an idea of a Surprising Vegan food group I should tackle? Leave it in a comment below!


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Surprising Vegan Alcohol

The holidays are fast approaching and that means one thing: Parties.

If you’re vegan, the holidays are hard enough: dealing with family members asking questions, ‘joking’ about veganism with you, and let’s not forget the giant, dead sentient being in the middle of the table. While I’m not saying alcohol is the answer, you can’t deny having a drink might make the holidays that much more bearable.

Or, perhaps, you’re hosting a party, and know a vegan is coming, and want them to at least have some sort of drink option other then water. (And are freaking out because you don’t know what to look for)

Whatever the reason you’re here, you can rest easy knowing the below are vegan-friendly (even though they don’t say on the bottle).

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Here is a list of the alcohol pictured, starting in the top left corner and continuing clockwise:

  • Smirnoff Ice
  • Guinness Original*
  • Guinness Draught
  • Guinness Extra Stout
  • Guinness Foreign Stout
  • Mill Street Lager
  • Mike’s Hard Lemonade**
  • Stella Artois
  • Stella 4%
  • Blackfly Grape***
  • Blackfly Sour Cherry
  • Blackfly Orange
  • Jaw Drop Gushing Grapes****
  • Jaw Drop Puckering Punch
  • Jaw Drop Sucking Lemons
  • Jaw Drop Tickling Pink
  • Jaw Drop Licking Limes
  • Jaw Drop Flashing Peaches
  • Jaw Drop Squirting Oranges
  • Smirnoff Ice Raspberry
  • Smirnoff Ice Green Apple
  • Bailey’s Almande
  • Corona
  • Absolut Vodka*****

As you can see from the above list, there are many different types of alcohol that vegans can drink, even if they’re not marketed as ‘vegan’. Hopefully, this list helps you out with your future holiday planning, and if you’re a vegan going to a party and you’re not sure if there will be drinks you can have, keep your eye out for one of the above.

Have a drink that’s not on this list you’re wondering might be vegan? Check out Barnivore.com for a more complete list of vegan alcohol. The cool thing about them, is they don’t only tell you what’s vegan, they also tell you what’s not.


Like this list? Check out more Vegan Tips here!

*From Guinness’ FAQs: Yes, it is (vegan) from the keg format for now. Our new filtration process has removed the use of isinglass as a means of filtration and vegans can now enjoy a pint of Guinness.

All Guinness Draught in keg format is brewed without using isinglass. Full distribution of bottle and can formats will be in place by the end of 2017, so until then, our advice to vegans is to consume the product from the keg format only for now.

**Mike’s Hard Lemonade LITE contains honey

***All Blackfly flavours are vegan! I e-mailed the company and was very pleased to hear the news. The flavours pictured are the only ones I’ve been able to find (in Canada)

****All Jaw Drop flavours are also vegan! As said in this tweet, straight from the company. The flavours pictured are (again), the only ones I’ve found

*****A note on Barnivore from 2014 says the owner of Absolut is a ‘major funder of bullfighting’ (No update as of posting)

Honey

If ever there was a trigger word in the vegan community, honey is hands down in the top 5. I’ve never seen more of a divide in the community then when someone brings up honey. Some of you non-vegans might be surprised to learn that there’s more foods we (vegans) don’t eat aside from meat and dairy. (And eggs)

I personally don’t eat honey, for reasons I’ll talk about below, but I want to start this by saying I didn’t write this article to sway anyone into not eating it. I understand honey has a lot of health benefits and it can even be used as medicine. I’m just a faceless post on a website stating the facts. What you do with those facts is completely up to you. I can’t force you, the same way I can’t force you to go vegan. All I can do is present the facts and hope you’ll make the compassionate choice.

But wait, aren’t they just bugs? Why should we care? Those are great questions, and, a valid point. Why care about bugs?

If you’re a vegan reading this, you should already know that we don’t wear silk, and that comes from worms. Along that same reasoning, animals are just animals, why bother sparing them? While I don’t have a dedicated article to the horrors animals endure in slaughterhouses, how about we go with sympathy? Animals have nervous systems, feel pain, joy, sadness, emotions – some of them are smarter then dogs, even. And eating dogs is ‘wrong’, right? It’s not a question about being exactly the same, it’s more having compassion for another living thing that we share the earth with. No offence, but animals were here long before humans, and they’ll (hopefully) be here long after we’re gone. Unfortunately, because of humans, lots of animals are now in danger of extinction. (Bees are on that list, BTW)

Let’s look at some facts about honey:

– It takes pollen from five million flowers to produce one pound of honey

– Beekeeper’s use cyanide gas so bees don’t fly away

– Clip wings of queen and/or will transfer her to a different colony (where she’ll most likely get killed by the other bees)

– Kill off the colonies because it’s not cost effective to have them fed through the winter months

(Want to learn more? I recommend checking out What The Health?)

And, of course, there’s the two reasons that made me stop eating honey:

– It’s bee vomit

– Stealing from baby bees

Yes, eating honey is stealing it from baby bees. You’re literally stealing candy from a baby. They produce honey as a way to get nutrients to the babies. You wouldn’t voluntarily steal food from any other baby, right? So why do it to bees? Not only is that like, super not cool, but bees are essential to the eco-system. The more we mistreat them to produce honey, the more endangered they become. The more endangered they become, well, it’s goodbye planet.

As I said above, it’s truly a personal choice, but I personally feel that 1) Ingesting someone else’s vomit is gross, and 2) I wouldn’t steal food from any other species baby, so why do it to bees? (Even if they are ‘just bugs’)

If you could help keep kids getting food/nutrients they need, and help the earth, by doing something as simple as changing what you put in your tea, or on your toast, is it really even still a question of whether or not you should?


Like this article? Check out vegan tips, recipes and more on my Veg Life page!

Surprising Vegan Candy

I’ve decided to turn ‘Surprising Vegan _____’ into a series, since there’s too many things to place in just 1 collage.

So, this week we’ll be looking at Surprising Vegan Candy. These are candies that are vegan friendly (in Canada), even though they’re not marketed as being vegan. (Hence the ‘surprise’)

AterImber.com - The Veg Life - Vegan Tips - Surprising Vegan Candy Collage

From the top left clockwise, this collage includes:

  • Swedish Fish (Red 40, Yellow 5+6, and Blue 1)
  • Twizzlers
  • Jolly Ranchers (Red 40, Blue 1 and Yellows 5+6)
  • JuJubes (Red 40, Blue 1 and Yellows 5+6)
  • Super Nibs
  • Maynards Fuzzy Peaches (Yellow 5, Red 40)
  • Nerds
  • Sour Patch Kids
  • Pixy Stix
  • Maynards Swedish Berries
  • Skittles Original
  • Maynards Sour Cherry Blasters (Contains Tartrazine [Yellow 5])
  • Rockets (Called Smarties in the US)
  • Pull N Peel
  • Airheads Originals (Red 40, Blue 1, Yellows 5+6)

Now, you may be wondering, why did I list Food Dyes next to some of the candy? Well, that’s because these food dyes aren’t vegan, since they’re tested on animals, and, Red 40 is made out of crushed cocchineal beetles. ‘But then, why list them on a vegan candy collage?!’ Well, I believe that this might be one of those ‘how far down the rabbit hole’ things. We all know it’s impossible to be 100% vegan already, and while that’s certainly not an excuse, I want to throw the choice to you. I’ve seen some vegan products that have the food dyes listed, so the choice is yours. It’s hard enough already to find ‘regular’ food that vegans can eat, don’t make it harder on yourself.

Eating some candy once in a while  won’t make the Vegan Police show up at your house and revoke your vegan card. Do I wish that these candies didn’t have the food dyes? Yes, of course. Am I guilty of still eating some of these candies on occasion? Yes, I am. While I do my best to completely avoid Red 40 (since, y’know it’s literally crushed beetles), I don’t agonize over the fact if I eat candy (whether intentionally or by accident) that have the other dyes in them. That doesn’t make me less vegan, and it won’t make you, either.

We don’t live in a society that caters to vegans, and, should you be in a pinch, or not able to make it to your favourite vegan store to stock up on ‘real’ vegan candy, it’s nice to know what ‘regular’ candy you can pick up without stressing about it, especially, say for Halloween, when you need to pick up a giant pack of candy for cheap (let’s face it, vegan candy is pretty expensive), these are regular candies that are sold in bulk, that you shouldn’t feel you need to completely get rid of.


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